Saturday, 10 November 2012

Gluten-free Honey Oat Bread


This is bread. Real bread. Real, gluten-free bread. Not the unpalatable, crumbly, horrible tasting stuff that health food stores call bread which you may have sampled in your quest for a happy life lived gluten-free. This is moist, flavorful, hearty, and bears the stamp of approval from even the most ardent of gluten connoisseurs in this family. One of the best parts is that you probably have most of the ingredients already in your cupboards other than the rice flour and xanthan gum, and since you are gluten-free people, maybe you have those too. Anywho, I hope you forgive me for taking so long to give you this recipe, but it did take quite a bit of trial and error to perfect so you SHOULD be grateful.

This is how we do it, kids. First we make the dough.

 

Beat up those eggs till they're all nice and fluffy. No kneading today!


Another cool thing about this bread... IT'S SINGLE RISE. As soon as the dough (or batter, whatever you want to call it) is all mixed up, you can dump it right into the pan you're going to bake it in and just let it rise once. You're welcome.


After about 45 minutes, it should have about doubled. 


Sprinkle it with some more oats if you want and then bake it. 


 And that's all. Hope you enjoy having toast and sandwiches again.



Gluten-free Honey Oat Bread 

3 1/3 cups oat flour (or 4 cups of gluten-free oats plus more for the top)
2 scant tablespoons yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons honey
1/2 cup corn starch (or tapioca flour)
1/2 cup rice flour (white or sweet white rice flour. Brown rice would probably work to but I haven't tried that yet)
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
4 eggs

If you're using whole oats, blend them in the food processor until they're pretty fine (as fine as you can get them). Meanwhile combine the yeast and water and let sit for a few minutes. Add the oil, honey, starch, flour, xanthan gum, and oats and beat until combined. Add the salt, cinnamon, and eggs. Beat for a few minutes until fluffy. Pour into a well greased 10 inch loaf pan and allow to rise for about 45 minutes until doubled. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350ºF. Sprinkle the top of the risen loaf with some more oats and cut a few slits in the top with a serrated knife. Bake for about 45 minutes. Allow to cool before cutting.

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64 comments:

  1. Are you able to post actual weight of ingredients Rather than by cup. Just these recipes never work out for me. Maybe cups are different sizes in UK LOL

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  2. Delicious! And no wierd aftertastes. Thanks for posting such a great bread recipe. I have been looking for a while and love the taste and texture of this one. Thanks again!

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  3. This is the best GF bread ever! No weird aftertastes! Nice texture. Thank you for sharing!

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  4. I have been looking for a good GF oat bread for a long time. Thank you for this recipe! Simply Amazing! I even played with the recipe as a guideline and made variations for an olive loaf and an onion bread. I can't thank you enough... even my non GF friends and family loved it!

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  5. By far the best gluten free bread recipe! It is so yummy. Thanks for sharing!!!!

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  6. Does this keep well at room temperature?

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    1. It usually doesn't last long enough to find out for me! I usually do just keep it in the cupboard, but maybe it would stay nicer in the refrigerator. I'm not sure!

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    2. Bread actually goes stale up to six times faster in the fridge :)

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  7. Do you think I could mix the dry ingredients together to store on hand for when I need to quickly whip this up? This looks great! Thank you!

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    1. Sure, great idea! I would probably just mix together the oat flour, cornstarch, rice flour, xanthan gum, salt, and cinnamon for whenever you need it.

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  9. Just made this bread and OMG.... soooo delicious! I just switched to gluten free and was getting depressed about the thought of not being able to enjoy REAL bread again. But this has proved me wrong! This is way yummier than any store-bought bread I had in the past, and just as good (and way easier to make!) than regular homemade bread. Definitely never buying bread ever again! Gonna make this each week :) You are seriously my hero!! THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS RECIPE!!

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  10. This is exceptional. Thanks for posting!

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  11. Hi, I'm really looking forward to baking this but I'm just wondering if I can sub the corn starch for arrowroot as we don't generally use cornstarch and I don't like the taste of tapioca. Thanks!

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  12. Does anyone think I can do this some other four than rice? I am allergic to rice, barley, rye and wheat. Thanks.

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    1. Hi Cynthia!
      I made it with 1/2 c. tapioca starch, and 1/2 c. sorghum flour, and it was fantastic.
      Are you able to eat sorghum?

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  13. I tried replacing the rice flour with Arrowroot flour/starch but the batter was so thick it broke my spatula, and so sticky if almost lifted back out of the bread pan when I was trying to get it scooped into it. Can anyone tell me what the consistency of the batter is supposed to be? I had to replace the corn starch with Tapioca starch, and my was very very thick and I suspect it is the tapioca/arrowroot starch causing this. I would love an alternative to rice flour as well. I think knowing what the batter texture should be will help me sort this out. I put a small container of water in the microwave and heated it up to steaming and then just sat the bread pan in there with it for the rise time because humidity is required for successful rising. It actually did work and it rose up past the edge of the pan and baked up without falling. The loaf came out dense with good texture and what I thought would be a successful door stop was really a successful loaf of bread. Will definitely try again.

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  14. This is wonderful! Thank you!!! BTW-for those looking for a substitute for the rice flour...what about chickpea flour?? I made another bread with that...and it's good. :)

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  17. I'm wondering if the cinnamon is very noticeable? I'd love to make some for toast/breakfast that tastes like cinnamon, just definitely not for sandwiches. Lol

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  18. FINALLY! A recipe that works and the bread actually rises and stays. I love oat flour, so I am glad to find a GF bread that I didn't mess up.

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  19. Ummmm how did you fit this into a pan that size? mine like exploded over the edges when it rose and i didn't even put the whole amount of batter in it!

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  20. Mine went over the edges as well. What kind of yeast did you use?

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  21. Is there a substitute for the honey? My husband has a fructose allergy...

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    1. I made this without the honey - just added more water to replace the missing liquid. It worked well although I'll definitely add more salt next time as it was definitely lacking in flavour. The finished loaves had a lovely texture although I despaired when mixing it as it was so thick.

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  22. I split my dough into a 9" loaf pan and a 7" and it still came close to going over the edges, so I agree with others that I don't know how you'd fit it into a 10" pan. But thank you for giving me bread back! It actually looks, feels, and tastes like real bread!

    For any others who might be trying to go gum-free, I substituted 2 T ground flax seed for the xanthan gum and it worked perfectly. The dough turned out more like batter with that switch, but it baked up beautifully.

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    1. 2t, sorry. For some reason I have tablespoons in my head, but I wrote down teaspoons so that must be what I put in.

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    2. thank you! i need to get rid of corn

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  23. I am super excited to try thiS. I am with Sophie though, I usually have better luck baking by weight with gf flours. If you could tell us the weights from your food scale, it would be so helpful. :-) (For example: do use a spoon to fill the measuring cup then level it off, or do you use your measuring cup to scoop the flour sort of packing it in there. You would have different amounts of flour depending on the way you measure it, so weight definately matters) Thank you for this recipe, I really appreciate all that you had to go through to perfect it. You are the best

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  24. Please remember not oats are alike. Be sure your oats are certified that they are grown in ground that has not been used to grow wheat or barley or rye previously.
    Farmers often rotate between green manure crops before they do cereal crops.

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  25. I am so excited to try this! Just a thought, for those doing gluten free, a lot of rolled oats ar coated it wheat flour to keep them from sticking together - you need to get the ones marked gluten free. also - I have uesd steel cut oats in a few recipes, ground up - is there any reason why that wouldn't work here?

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  27. I made this yesterday and I am thrilled!! The oats ground up perfectly in the food processor and the ingredients were all in my pantry which is rare with gluten free recipes. The finished product is light, moist, fluffy, crispy crust and tastes delicious, it reminds me of whole wheat bread that I used to love. My husband is on a renal diet and I thought I would never find gluten free that bread that is also low in potassium, I used tapioca starch and omitted the salt but will use just a bit next time, but even without it the honey and cinnamon give it enough sweet so its doesn't taste bland at all. Only thing is, it rose, and rose and rose.! I overfilled the bread pan thinking it would only rise a little as most gluten free breads do, but I am not complaining at all. I will just make a couple sandwich buns on the side next time.

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  29. My first try with a gluten free bread and aren't I feeling lucky to have tried this one first! Delicious! For those who had the bread raise up and out of your pan, I made one 9x4" loaf and also a small round loaf. The dough does double as it rises as the recipe said it would. We are so happy to finally have a delicious bread to eat without wheat! Thank you!

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  30. I am excited to try this recipe! I've been looking for a healthy and tasty gf bread. Could I substitute 1 cup+ 2 tsp of any gf flour blend (that includes xantham gum) for the cornstarch, rice flour & xantham gum? Would the xantham gum that's in the flour blend be enough to compensate for the oat flour as well (or does oat flour even need xantham gum?)? Also, would this work in a bread machine?? Thanks!!

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  31. This is heaven on a plate! Made some slight alterations.. split the oat/rice flour ratio 50:50 so used about 2 cups of each, used coconut oil rather than olive oil and used 2 tbsp yeast rather than 2 tsp. Have spread a slice with honey and am scoffing as I write!

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  32. This was delicious and easy. Thank you for the recipe!

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  33. Just made a loaf - this is delicious and so very easy! I've tried several GF things, but they have all had that nasty after-taste/feel to it. This doesn't at all. Thanks so very much!

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  34. Did you use instant yeast? I have been trying to make bread this week and I am having problems getting it to rise.

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    1. I probably used instant dry. If you're having trouble, try buying new yeast. Your bread won't rise if it's dead!

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    3. Besides different yeast... try adding the honey in with the water to feed to yeast and see if you have better luck. Also, the temperature of the water can't be too hot or too cold with yeast. The rule I was told (and it works for me) is to run the water temp at the sink until you can only hold your hand under it for about 15 seconds.

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  35. I'm embarrassed to say how many times I've made this since discovering it on Monday. It's SO GOOD. I had literally given up ever eating good bread again...until now! Even my gluten eating husband loves it! Huge fans. Thank you so much!

    P.S. I use brown rice flour, and it works great!

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  36. Anyone tried this in their breadmaker?

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  37. I made this but sadly it turned out dense and crumbly.:-( I'll try again but what consistency is the finished bread supposed to be? Like quick breads or like yeast breads? Mine was definitely like a failed quick bread. My yeast was fresh although I followed the directions on the pack which said to mix it in with the flour rather than stirring it in the water...maybe that was my error?

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  38. Mine was a huge failure in the breadmaker. I tried again using the standard recipe. It actually made 2 10" loaf pans for me. I think its is bc it is warm here and the yeast was happy with the heat. Delish, btw. My hubs and the kids love it.

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  39. Replaced some of the oat flour with pea flour and used more rice flour (didn't have enough oat flour at home). Also had to replace xanthan gum with gelatin and added some cardamom. And it came out quite good, a bit different but interesting taste - pea flour gives a kind of nutty taste. Texture was good, perhaps should have let it rise longer before baking. Excellent recipe.

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  40. Excellent texture. I used brown rice flour I ground myself and sifted to make sure it was small enough. I didn't do that the first time and the bread was a little crumby. I was able to make two loaves, not one, but they were a little one the short side. I tried increasing the ingredients by a third and err'd on 6 eggs instead of five. Next time, I'll use 5 eggs and stick with two tablespoons of yeast as the bread fell and that's usually the issue with whole wheat breads I've made. Also, it needs to be taken out of the pans to cool or it gets soggy. A Tasty and forgiving bread. Thanks for posting this - I've tried a lot of gluten free breads and this is by far the best one.

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  41. We learned that our 8 year old son has a wheat allergy. It was a big adjustment for us at first. We love this bread in our family (including those of us that don't have a wheat allergy). Thank you!

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  42. I know it's a long shot... but I'm allergic to eggs and am DYING to make this bread! Has anyone tried any egg replacements?

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    1. I didn't have enough eggs so I used ground flax seed and water and worked perfectly.

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  43. How does this do in the freezer? Is it best eaten fresh or is it just as good if frozen?

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  44. I've been on a hunt for the right gluten free bread recipe for months now and thanks to you my search is over! With every prior recipe I've tried the bread has turned out either too crumbly, too dry, too dense, or just didn't taste any good. This bread turned out AWESOME! The flavor is so yummy and it's just moist enough that I enjoying eating the bread all by itself!

    I like to pre soak my flours so I added all but 1/4 cup of the water and added two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to it and let the dough sit overnight so that the grains would become "predigested." The next day when I was ready to bake I put the yeast into the remaining 1/4 cup of water before mixing it into the dough. It rose very nicely and in half the suggested time (soaking flours tends to make them rise more easily).

    I was worried that my food processor didn't grind the oats finely enough but the few little larger bits actually gave the bread a bit of a nutty texture which I really enjoyed! I plan on purchasing a grain mill soon so I'll be experimenting with using different coarsenesses of the oat flour to see how it affects the texture of the bread.

    I couldn't be happier or more
    excited to finally have found my go-to bread recipe. When my toddler developed an allergy to milk and wheat I went on a crusade to find a wheat-free, dairy-free bread recipe that would be good enough to not make me miss the gluteny version, and I was starting to lose hope until I came across your recipe. Thank you so much!



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  45. This was fantastic! I omitted the cinnamon and only used about a 1/4 tsp honey, since I wanted to use it for my husband's lunches and I used ground flax meal in boiling water instead of the xanthan gum and the bread was perfect! My husband even loved it!

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  46. Help! I have made this bread twice w/out great results. The first time I used the wrong size pan and it exploded and I had a huge mess. The second time, I used the correct pan size but it sunk in the middle. I made sure it was baked through and was at 200 degrees before taking out of the oven. I love the flavor of this bread; I just need some help in getting it right. I used quick rise yeast by Red Star. Is that the correct type of yeast to use? What is the best way to store this bread and how long can it be stored? I would great appreciate any advice given. Thanks!

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  47. Additional note: It raised quickly and high in the pan before baking it.

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  48. Yammie this is amazing! Can you suggest anyway to make it yeast free?

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  49. Can anyone who made this bread successfully, please tell what type of yeast you used i.e. instant, active, quick-rise, etc. Thanks!

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    1. I used bread machine yeast which I think is the same as active dry.

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  50. Hi can anyone tell me if the eggs can be removed from recipe and what would they be replaced with?

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  51. Can anyone tell me where I went wrong?? I'm a novice baker and wanted to make my own GF bread. I followed the directions through the first mixing (adding everything but eggs and spices), and I didn't even have real dough, just pure liquid! I keep triple-checking that I didn't get proportions wrong, but I didn't! I'm just completely baffled - did anyone else have this problem? It's seriously just liquid, nothing "fluffy" about it...

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