Saturday, 10 November 2012

Gluten-free Honey Oat Bread


This is bread. Real bread. Real, gluten-free bread. Not the unpalatable, crumbly, horrible tasting stuff that health food stores call bread which you may have sampled in your quest for a happy life lived gluten-free. This is moist, flavorful, hearty, and bears the stamp of approval from even the most ardent of gluten connoisseurs in this family. One of the best parts is that you probably have most of the ingredients already in your cupboards other than the rice flour and xanthan gum, and since you are gluten-free people, maybe you have those too. Anywho, I hope you forgive me for taking so long to give you this recipe, but it did take quite a bit of trial and error to perfect so you SHOULD be grateful.

This is how we do it, kids. First we make the dough.

 

Beat up those eggs till they're all nice and fluffy. No kneading today!


Another cool thing about this bread... IT'S SINGLE RISE. As soon as the dough (or batter, whatever you want to call it) is all mixed up, you can dump it right into the pan you're going to bake it in and just let it rise once. You're welcome.


After about 45 minutes, it should have about doubled. 


Sprinkle it with some more oats if you want and then bake it. 


 And that's all. Hope you enjoy having toast and sandwiches again.



Gluten-free Honey Oat Bread 

3 1/3 cups oat flour (or 4 cups of gluten-free oats plus more for the top)
2 scant tablespoons yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons honey
1/2 cup corn starch (or tapioca flour)
1/2 cup rice flour (white or sweet white rice flour. Brown rice would probably work too but I haven't tried that yet)
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
4 eggs

If you're using whole oats, blend them in the food processor until they're pretty fine (as fine as you can get them). Meanwhile combine the yeast and water and let sit for a few minutes. Add the oil, honey, starch, flour, xanthan gum, and oats and beat until combined. Add the salt, cinnamon, and eggs. Beat for a few minutes until fluffy. Pour into a well greased 10 inch loaf pan and allow to rise for about 45 minutes until doubled. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350ºF. Sprinkle the top of the risen loaf with some more oats and cut a few slits in the top with a serrated knife. Bake for about 45 minutes. Allow to cool before cutting.

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105 comments:

  1. Are you able to post actual weight of ingredients Rather than by cup. Just these recipes never work out for me. Maybe cups are different sizes in UK LOL

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    1. They are different. I may have to conbert to the metric measurements instead.

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  2. Delicious! And no wierd aftertastes. Thanks for posting such a great bread recipe. I have been looking for a while and love the taste and texture of this one. Thanks again!

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  3. This is the best GF bread ever! No weird aftertastes! Nice texture. Thank you for sharing!

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  4. I have been looking for a good GF oat bread for a long time. Thank you for this recipe! Simply Amazing! I even played with the recipe as a guideline and made variations for an olive loaf and an onion bread. I can't thank you enough... even my non GF friends and family loved it!

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  5. By far the best gluten free bread recipe! It is so yummy. Thanks for sharing!!!!

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  6. Does this keep well at room temperature?

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    1. It usually doesn't last long enough to find out for me! I usually do just keep it in the cupboard, but maybe it would stay nicer in the refrigerator. I'm not sure!

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    2. Bread actually goes stale up to six times faster in the fridge :)

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  7. Do you think I could mix the dry ingredients together to store on hand for when I need to quickly whip this up? This looks great! Thank you!

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    1. Sure, great idea! I would probably just mix together the oat flour, cornstarch, rice flour, xanthan gum, salt, and cinnamon for whenever you need it.

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  9. Just made this bread and OMG.... soooo delicious! I just switched to gluten free and was getting depressed about the thought of not being able to enjoy REAL bread again. But this has proved me wrong! This is way yummier than any store-bought bread I had in the past, and just as good (and way easier to make!) than regular homemade bread. Definitely never buying bread ever again! Gonna make this each week :) You are seriously my hero!! THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS RECIPE!!

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  10. This is exceptional. Thanks for posting!

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  11. Hi, I'm really looking forward to baking this but I'm just wondering if I can sub the corn starch for arrowroot as we don't generally use cornstarch and I don't like the taste of tapioca. Thanks!

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    2. I substituted a few ingredients, one of them being replacing the corn startch with arrowroot and it turned out fine :)

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  12. Does anyone think I can do this some other four than rice? I am allergic to rice, barley, rye and wheat. Thanks.

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    1. Hi Cynthia!
      I made it with 1/2 c. tapioca starch, and 1/2 c. sorghum flour, and it was fantastic.
      Are you able to eat sorghum?

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    2. I substituted a few ingredients, one of them being replacing the rice flour (I didn't have any) with coconut flour and it turned out fine :) It probably gave it a slightly denser texture but tastes really nice. I'm going to buy more rice flour and compare! This bread is yummy!

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  13. I tried replacing the rice flour with Arrowroot flour/starch but the batter was so thick it broke my spatula, and so sticky if almost lifted back out of the bread pan when I was trying to get it scooped into it. Can anyone tell me what the consistency of the batter is supposed to be? I had to replace the corn starch with Tapioca starch, and my was very very thick and I suspect it is the tapioca/arrowroot starch causing this. I would love an alternative to rice flour as well. I think knowing what the batter texture should be will help me sort this out. I put a small container of water in the microwave and heated it up to steaming and then just sat the bread pan in there with it for the rise time because humidity is required for successful rising. It actually did work and it rose up past the edge of the pan and baked up without falling. The loaf came out dense with good texture and what I thought would be a successful door stop was really a successful loaf of bread. Will definitely try again.

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    1. Hi, I'm just guessing, but from reading the above, if you replace cornstarch with arrow root then arrowroot must be a thickener as well. therefore, the arrowroot is making your bread very very thick.

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    2. I would think potato starch would work too.

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  14. This is wonderful! Thank you!!! BTW-for those looking for a substitute for the rice flour...what about chickpea flour?? I made another bread with that...and it's good. :)

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  17. I'm wondering if the cinnamon is very noticeable? I'd love to make some for toast/breakfast that tastes like cinnamon, just definitely not for sandwiches. Lol

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  18. FINALLY! A recipe that works and the bread actually rises and stays. I love oat flour, so I am glad to find a GF bread that I didn't mess up.

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  19. Ummmm how did you fit this into a pan that size? mine like exploded over the edges when it rose and i didn't even put the whole amount of batter in it!

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  20. Mine went over the edges as well. What kind of yeast did you use?

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  21. Is there a substitute for the honey? My husband has a fructose allergy...

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    1. I made this without the honey - just added more water to replace the missing liquid. It worked well although I'll definitely add more salt next time as it was definitely lacking in flavour. The finished loaves had a lovely texture although I despaired when mixing it as it was so thick.

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  22. I split my dough into a 9" loaf pan and a 7" and it still came close to going over the edges, so I agree with others that I don't know how you'd fit it into a 10" pan. But thank you for giving me bread back! It actually looks, feels, and tastes like real bread!

    For any others who might be trying to go gum-free, I substituted 2 T ground flax seed for the xanthan gum and it worked perfectly. The dough turned out more like batter with that switch, but it baked up beautifully.

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    1. 2t, sorry. For some reason I have tablespoons in my head, but I wrote down teaspoons so that must be what I put in.

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    2. thank you! i need to get rid of corn

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  23. I am super excited to try thiS. I am with Sophie though, I usually have better luck baking by weight with gf flours. If you could tell us the weights from your food scale, it would be so helpful. :-) (For example: do use a spoon to fill the measuring cup then level it off, or do you use your measuring cup to scoop the flour sort of packing it in there. You would have different amounts of flour depending on the way you measure it, so weight definately matters) Thank you for this recipe, I really appreciate all that you had to go through to perfect it. You are the best

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  24. Please remember not oats are alike. Be sure your oats are certified that they are grown in ground that has not been used to grow wheat or barley or rye previously.
    Farmers often rotate between green manure crops before they do cereal crops.

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  25. I am so excited to try this! Just a thought, for those doing gluten free, a lot of rolled oats ar coated it wheat flour to keep them from sticking together - you need to get the ones marked gluten free. also - I have uesd steel cut oats in a few recipes, ground up - is there any reason why that wouldn't work here?

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  27. I made this yesterday and I am thrilled!! The oats ground up perfectly in the food processor and the ingredients were all in my pantry which is rare with gluten free recipes. The finished product is light, moist, fluffy, crispy crust and tastes delicious, it reminds me of whole wheat bread that I used to love. My husband is on a renal diet and I thought I would never find gluten free that bread that is also low in potassium, I used tapioca starch and omitted the salt but will use just a bit next time, but even without it the honey and cinnamon give it enough sweet so its doesn't taste bland at all. Only thing is, it rose, and rose and rose.! I overfilled the bread pan thinking it would only rise a little as most gluten free breads do, but I am not complaining at all. I will just make a couple sandwich buns on the side next time.

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  29. My first try with a gluten free bread and aren't I feeling lucky to have tried this one first! Delicious! For those who had the bread raise up and out of your pan, I made one 9x4" loaf and also a small round loaf. The dough does double as it rises as the recipe said it would. We are so happy to finally have a delicious bread to eat without wheat! Thank you!

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  30. I am excited to try this recipe! I've been looking for a healthy and tasty gf bread. Could I substitute 1 cup+ 2 tsp of any gf flour blend (that includes xantham gum) for the cornstarch, rice flour & xantham gum? Would the xantham gum that's in the flour blend be enough to compensate for the oat flour as well (or does oat flour even need xantham gum?)? Also, would this work in a bread machine?? Thanks!!

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  31. This is heaven on a plate! Made some slight alterations.. split the oat/rice flour ratio 50:50 so used about 2 cups of each, used coconut oil rather than olive oil and used 2 tbsp yeast rather than 2 tsp. Have spread a slice with honey and am scoffing as I write!

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  32. This was delicious and easy. Thank you for the recipe!

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  33. Just made a loaf - this is delicious and so very easy! I've tried several GF things, but they have all had that nasty after-taste/feel to it. This doesn't at all. Thanks so very much!

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  34. Did you use instant yeast? I have been trying to make bread this week and I am having problems getting it to rise.

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    1. I probably used instant dry. If you're having trouble, try buying new yeast. Your bread won't rise if it's dead!

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    3. Besides different yeast... try adding the honey in with the water to feed to yeast and see if you have better luck. Also, the temperature of the water can't be too hot or too cold with yeast. The rule I was told (and it works for me) is to run the water temp at the sink until you can only hold your hand under it for about 15 seconds.

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  35. I'm embarrassed to say how many times I've made this since discovering it on Monday. It's SO GOOD. I had literally given up ever eating good bread again...until now! Even my gluten eating husband loves it! Huge fans. Thank you so much!

    P.S. I use brown rice flour, and it works great!

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  36. Anyone tried this in their breadmaker?

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  37. I made this but sadly it turned out dense and crumbly.:-( I'll try again but what consistency is the finished bread supposed to be? Like quick breads or like yeast breads? Mine was definitely like a failed quick bread. My yeast was fresh although I followed the directions on the pack which said to mix it in with the flour rather than stirring it in the water...maybe that was my error?

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  38. Mine was a huge failure in the breadmaker. I tried again using the standard recipe. It actually made 2 10" loaf pans for me. I think its is bc it is warm here and the yeast was happy with the heat. Delish, btw. My hubs and the kids love it.

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  39. Replaced some of the oat flour with pea flour and used more rice flour (didn't have enough oat flour at home). Also had to replace xanthan gum with gelatin and added some cardamom. And it came out quite good, a bit different but interesting taste - pea flour gives a kind of nutty taste. Texture was good, perhaps should have let it rise longer before baking. Excellent recipe.

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  40. Excellent texture. I used brown rice flour I ground myself and sifted to make sure it was small enough. I didn't do that the first time and the bread was a little crumby. I was able to make two loaves, not one, but they were a little one the short side. I tried increasing the ingredients by a third and err'd on 6 eggs instead of five. Next time, I'll use 5 eggs and stick with two tablespoons of yeast as the bread fell and that's usually the issue with whole wheat breads I've made. Also, it needs to be taken out of the pans to cool or it gets soggy. A Tasty and forgiving bread. Thanks for posting this - I've tried a lot of gluten free breads and this is by far the best one.

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  41. We learned that our 8 year old son has a wheat allergy. It was a big adjustment for us at first. We love this bread in our family (including those of us that don't have a wheat allergy). Thank you!

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  42. I know it's a long shot... but I'm allergic to eggs and am DYING to make this bread! Has anyone tried any egg replacements?

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    1. I didn't have enough eggs so I used ground flax seed and water and worked perfectly.

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    2. Me too - I have an egg allergy :( I replaced the eggs with a product called No Egg by Orgran. Turned out fine (great product by the way, never fails to be a great egg replacement).

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  43. How does this do in the freezer? Is it best eaten fresh or is it just as good if frozen?

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  44. I've been on a hunt for the right gluten free bread recipe for months now and thanks to you my search is over! With every prior recipe I've tried the bread has turned out either too crumbly, too dry, too dense, or just didn't taste any good. This bread turned out AWESOME! The flavor is so yummy and it's just moist enough that I enjoying eating the bread all by itself!

    I like to pre soak my flours so I added all but 1/4 cup of the water and added two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to it and let the dough sit overnight so that the grains would become "predigested." The next day when I was ready to bake I put the yeast into the remaining 1/4 cup of water before mixing it into the dough. It rose very nicely and in half the suggested time (soaking flours tends to make them rise more easily).

    I was worried that my food processor didn't grind the oats finely enough but the few little larger bits actually gave the bread a bit of a nutty texture which I really enjoyed! I plan on purchasing a grain mill soon so I'll be experimenting with using different coarsenesses of the oat flour to see how it affects the texture of the bread.

    I couldn't be happier or more
    excited to finally have found my go-to bread recipe. When my toddler developed an allergy to milk and wheat I went on a crusade to find a wheat-free, dairy-free bread recipe that would be good enough to not make me miss the gluteny version, and I was starting to lose hope until I came across your recipe. Thank you so much!



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  45. This was fantastic! I omitted the cinnamon and only used about a 1/4 tsp honey, since I wanted to use it for my husband's lunches and I used ground flax meal in boiling water instead of the xanthan gum and the bread was perfect! My husband even loved it!

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    1. So, you basically added no honey? A 1/4 tsp? thats nothing really why even add that?
      thanks :)

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  46. Help! I have made this bread twice w/out great results. The first time I used the wrong size pan and it exploded and I had a huge mess. The second time, I used the correct pan size but it sunk in the middle. I made sure it was baked through and was at 200 degrees before taking out of the oven. I love the flavor of this bread; I just need some help in getting it right. I used quick rise yeast by Red Star. Is that the correct type of yeast to use? What is the best way to store this bread and how long can it be stored? I would great appreciate any advice given. Thanks!

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  47. Additional note: It raised quickly and high in the pan before baking it.

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    1. Another Post had said: This is easily the best GF bread recipe I have found to date, though thinking the 2 tablespoons of yeast was a typo I used 2 TEASPOONS of yeast (1 pack of active dry yeast here in the USA) It came out perfect every time.

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  48. Yammie this is amazing! Can you suggest anyway to make it yeast free?

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    1. I just Made this yeast free today! My husband is starting the low FODMAP diet tomorrow, so I needed a replacement. Use baking soda and lemon juice, equal parts of each. So, for this recipe, 1 tablespoon baking soda, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and mix them together. The batter doesn't need to rise if you use this. Also, I kept the amount of warm water the same.

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    2. Did you use tablespoon or teaspoon when you made it yeast free? Thanks

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    3. In the oven baking as we speak. Thank you

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  49. Can anyone who made this bread successfully, please tell what type of yeast you used i.e. instant, active, quick-rise, etc. Thanks!

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    1. I used bread machine yeast which I think is the same as active dry.

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    2. Another Post said: This is easily the best GF bread recipe I have found to date, though thinking the 2 tablespoons of yeast was a typo I used 2 TEASPOONS of yeast (1 pack of active dry yeast here in the USA) Turns out perfect every time.

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  50. Hi can anyone tell me if the eggs can be removed from recipe and what would they be replaced with?

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    1. Probably flax eggs or chia eggs, I've never done it but have read that it can be done. Google how to make them!

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    2. Kimberly Smith wrote above regarding Egg Replacement the following: Me too - I have an egg allergy :( I replaced the eggs with a product called No Egg by Orgran. Turned out fine (great product by the way, never fails to be a great egg replacement).

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  51. Can anyone tell me where I went wrong?? I'm a novice baker and wanted to make my own GF bread. I followed the directions through the first mixing (adding everything but eggs and spices), and I didn't even have real dough, just pure liquid! I keep triple-checking that I didn't get proportions wrong, but I didn't! I'm just completely baffled - did anyone else have this problem? It's seriously just liquid, nothing "fluffy" about it...

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  52. Does anyone have measure ment in grams, since I will be using the scales? Thanks

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    1. Hello,

      I measured for you:

      Oat flour = 472g
      Tapioca/arrowroot flour = 65g
      Rice flour = 88g
      Xantham gum = 11g
      Salt = 8g

      Hope this helps! :)

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  53. This is easily the best GF bread recipe I have found to date, though thinking the 2 tablespoons of yeast was a typo I used 2 TEASPOONS of yeast (1 pack of active dry yeast here in the USA) - and I used egg beaters to replace 2 of the whole eggs ... the bread comes out perfect every time.
    It freezes really well for use as toast (I slice it thick and freeze in a plastic bag, taking out what I want as I need it). Leave out the cinnamon for a good sandwich and cheese on toast bread. I even used it to replace burger buns yesterday, sliced it thick and lightly toasted it on the grill. For those of you looking for weights I will try to remember to weigh the cups out next time I make it.

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  54. oh - and I used Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free oat flour instead of grinding fresh oats ...

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  55. This is my go-to bread for our whole family! It makes 2 loaves for me and we eat one and freeze one (2 slices at a time for sandwiches). The taste is amazing and I love the oats. I usually process 4 extra cups of each when I make it so that I can skip that step the following time. I think I will try the 2 tsp of yeast though because sometimes it falls after baking. Thank you for this wonderful recipe!

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  56. Tried to make this twice, awful recipe. Never turned out right. Doesn't fully cook in the time specified (45 mins) in fact it didn't bake all the way through even over an hour. (toothpick didn't come out clean). You're better off buying Canyon Ranch GFree bread from Whole Foods. Tastes wonderful and saves you the costs and frustration of having to buy all those different types of flour. Even underbaking it and tasting the bread, it still tasted like crap.

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    1. Another Post had said: This is easily the best GF bread recipe I have found to date, though thinking the 2 tablespoons of yeast was a typo I used 2 TEASPOONS of yeast (1 pack of active dry yeast here in the USA) It came out perfect every time.

      So Van, if it rose too much that could be causing bread in oven to either fall or take long time. Also, if your flour grind isn't fine enough it will cause bread to be too crumbly. So far in reading all these comments, you are the only person who has a negative opinion of this. I would encourage you to read all the posted comments to learn more about variations, substitutions and measurements/weights of ingreds. I've learned there are so many different ways to alter this recipe and also keeping it the way it is for different results. :) If you own a food processor, you can make practically any flour that'll work for this recipe. Flax seed flour, chick-pea flour, brown rice flour, oat flour, etc...

      Also, I even read from the comments that one person found a yeast-free way to make this using equal parts of Baking Soda mixed with Lemon Juice! And others added flavors such as more or less cinnamon, cardamom, coconut oil instead of olive oil, onion, cheese...etc.

      I'm going to be trying this with Pumpkin puree and fine Black pepper as I've made muffins with these two ingred's that were out of this world good! Raisins may be a good addition for breakfast toast. I have a feeling the original recipe mistook TABLESPOONS for the more appropriate TEASPOONs when it came to the yeast tho, cuz that can cause major fail in both too much dough rising, and also when that risen dough falls inside the oven.

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  57. Just made it, and it's very good! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Did you weigh the ingredients? I'm having trouble measuring out the flour can you help me out?

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  58. hi. Just curious, but has anyone tried grinding Quinoa into flour and using that?

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    1. wow that is a great idea I may be inclined to try! I have yet to try this recipe as I just have found it and have been reading every comment before I venture downstairs to my kitchen (laboratory - muahahahahhhaaa!) O.o. I'm going to make the Quinoa flour because we have it on hand and I'm out of rice flour! I'll try to get back to you asap! Thanks for the great idea!

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  59. I don't have xanthum gum or corn starch. Can I make the bread without them?

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    1. Hi Sharon, I've been reading and taking notes from all these comments before trying this recipe today. I can report to you that someone commented that they replaced the Xanthum Gum with 2 teaspoons of ground flax seed.... they added that the dough would be more batter-like but that it turned out great. :D Good luck! :D

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  60. First you must know that I am so not a baker! I made this recipe exactly as written. I expected another gluten free bread that claimed to be soooo good that it could replace wonder bread and then be disappointed because it was another gummy loaf of tasteless nothing. It didn't replace wonder bread but it did get a "oh my god, this is good" rating. It's not gummy, it tastes good. I couldn't wait and had to have a piece with a little butter while it was still warm and did a little happy dance around my kitchen. This is by far the best recipe that I have found.

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  61. Thanks for this recipe! I cannot wait to take all I've read here to the proving grounds (kitchen). I'm hoping I can do this recipe justice! By reading and taking notes, I thought I'd share them so someone out there won't need to search every comment here!

    Possible Recipe Correction:
    Use 1 package of Active Dry Yeast or 2 TEASPOONS rather than 2 tablespoons according to several peeps.

    Replacing/substitutions that worked for others:

    EGGs: No Eggs by Orgran
    Flours: Chickpea, Brown Rice, Quinoa (not proven yet)
    Xanthum Gum: 2 tsp ground Flax Seed
    Honey: Use Agave Nectar but keep in mind it may be sweeter than honey so experiment!
    (fyi-Stevia has a horrible bitter aftertaste unless using honey with it. If you add lemon to any stevia recipe the lemon will enhance the bitter aftertaste of the stevia, whereas the honey will dissipate the bitter aftertaste of stevia.)

    To make this recipe Yeast-free:
    1 TBSP Baking Soda + 1 TBSP Lemon Juice. Mix together and keep amount of warm water originally called for in recipe.

    WEIGHTED INGREDS:
    Oat Flour= 472g
    Tapioca, arrowroot, cornstarch = 65g
    Rice Flour = 88g
    Xanthum Gum = 11g
    Salt = 8g

    Other notables suggested here:
    OATS:
    Use Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free Oat Flour instead of grinding.
    Be sure Oats are marked Gluten-free as sometimes Oats are coated with Wheat Flour in order to keep them from sticking.

    YEAST:
    Rule of thumb for Yeast Water Temp: Run water temp at sink until you can only hold your hand under water for 15 seconds - that is temp you want for soaking yeast.

    If dough does not rise, yeast may be dead or try adding humidity. One comment said they put cup of water in microwave and nuked it till it was hot, then placed the loaf pan inside to get it to rise better.

    If your recipe is failing or is rising waaay too much, it is likely that too much yeast was used. Cut down original recipe to 2 teaspoons (1 package of active dry yeast). Also be sure your yeast isn't too old.

    Crumbly Bread:

    Flour wasn't fine enough. Grind to fine powder.

    There was a suggestion also to pre-digest (soak) the flours. I did not take notes on that one but it's here so if you scroll and skim, you may find that option also! :D

    Variations to this Bread:

    Tried and worked:
    Olive loaf
    Onion Bread
    Cardamom
    more cinnamon

    Good but not tried yet:
    Add Pecans
    Add Raisins
    Add Pumpkin Puree (I like adding fine black pepper to this ingredient for muffins!)

    Finally: It freezes well and can be grilled for Burgers. You may want to make 2 versions, 1 for breakfast that includes the cinnamon, and one for sandwiches that does not include cinnamon nor much honey.

    Yammie, I'm so elated you posted this recipe when you could have very well kept it a prized secret! Thanks for going through so much trial and error so we'd have within reach our very own GF bread that sounds exceptional. I go now, to try my own hand at this recipe! The people who commented here, have added such great input! Thanks for the wonderful info and notes! Good luck everyone and God bless you all!

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  62. Okay. I tried the Quinoa Flour in lieu of the Oat flour. It bombed big time bad. :( First off, milling the Quinoa was difficult. I first tried it in our food processor but since the round pellets are so small they were not being broken down by the blade. Instead I ended up milling 4 cups of Quinoa using a large mortar and pestle. I added small amounts at a time and even after breaking it down to a powder and sifting it into a bowl, it still was pretty grainy. So I added the powder to the food processor in an attempt to break it down into a finer powder but it was still not quite there. The dough that resulted had a consistency of grainy corn bread batter only it wasn't pourable like corn bread.

    Quinoa, though a fine idea, added a very strong flavor that was off-putting if you used it as the main flour amount, so if you do decide to use it, definitely use it for a rice flour sub, not oat flour sub as the rice flour is only 1/2 cup versus the 3 1/2 cups of oat flour measurement. Also, the taste was horrid using the Quinoa as the main flour. I know I should have only used it in the lesser amount flour but I decided to use it for the main ingredient due to the similar nutrient stats to oat flour and I knew oat flour can turn out grainy also.

    I think it would be okay to use the 3 1/2 cups of oat flour along with a 1/2 measure of quinoa if you wanted the added fiber and nutrients but it would definitely add double the calories per slice also.. so keep that in mind. :)

    I've stocked up on the original ingredients today and I'm planning on trying the recipe with tapioca flour in place of the corn starch. I'm hoping to make 2 loaves. One for cinnamon raisin bread, and the other for sandwiches where I'd delete the cinnamon and keep the rolled oats on the top. I may use a combination of agave and honey also.

    Yeast, for me I had on hand a new large bag of Red Star Active Dry Yeast. On its instructions it said to use 1/4 tsp for every cup of flour used. It also said in a different part on the bag to use 1 1/4 tsp of yeast per cup of flour. Sooooo..... I was perplexed of which measurement to use. I feel that since we are not dealing with regular wheat flour, that the extra yeast may be needed for heavier flours such as the oat flour and rice flour. For my attempt with the Quinoa flour batch, I used 2 1/2 tsp of yeast and that barely made my loaf cup up to the edge of the pan but I attribute this to the use of Quinoa flour as the main flour. I'll of course report back once I've tried another attempt. :)

    As for one poster's advice to just by Canyon Ranch GF Bread from Wholefoods, I did. Today we bought it to try it out. It is a very small loaf of bread for $6.99. I toasted 2 pieces and put Earth Balance margarine and sugar free strawberry jam on it. I have been without bread (Ezekiel 4:9 is hardly a bread substitute that delivers that bread feeling) for about a month and biting into the Canyon Ranch GF bread was divine. I cannot wait to compare it with this exceptionally reputed recipe here posted by Yammie. :D

    Tah tah. :D Thanks again for the joy of eating bread again! I cannot wait til I make this!

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    1. Thanks for all your extensive notes. Very helpful. :)

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  63. I love this bread, it is the best in the world and has saved my life. :D Can you make a bread machine version?

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  64. This is WONDERFUL, while it was still warm from the oven, I cut 2 pieces, with thick hummus spinich,shredded carrots with a black bean burger in the middle.Soo very good, and easy on the stomach. I will be making this weekly from now on.

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  65. Wwwpdxxx@gmail.com
    I tried this recipe and it is a wonderful and I must say quite versatile bread. Toasted, French toasted, scheme red etc. My only problem is I couldn't get it to rise. I proofed the yeast, tried the 2 tablespoon and the 2 teaspoon version but the rise was minimal if at all. I have made 3 loaves so far. The surface crust and the texture came out great. I let it rise in a moist warm enclosure. Baked in 1 pan and then tried it in 2. I've read thru all the ideas in the comments here but still have no solution.
    Another help request is....what are the specific purposes of the individual ingredients; for instance, what is the purpose of the Xanthum gum etc.

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    1. I would say that your dough is either too dry or your yeast is dead. If your yeast seems to be alive then I would try adding less flour next time.

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  66. Lovely recipe thank you for sharing! I used Sorghum in place of rice flour and potato starch. I love it!

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  67. Is anybody able to clarify the exact yeast amount required? Is it one 8g sachet?

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  68. Not sure what I did wrong... I used whole oats, so as instructed I ground 4 cups to flour consistency. I added all the other ingredients and by the time I was done mixing and poured it into my pan, the pan was filled up to the top. I hope it still works out... It still has yet to double...

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